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Ad-blockers aren’t ‘immoral,’ but maybe you’re using them wrong

21/05/2015

Last week we learned that some European mobile networks plan to block advertising across their services beginning later in 2015. (...)
Last week we learned that some European mobile networks plan to block advertising across their services beginning later in 2015. In response, Editor-in-Chief of The Next Web, Martin Bryant, wrote that ad blocking is “immoral” and that “ad-blocking folk out there are happily starving sites.” While I agree that blanket ad-blocking is perhaps unfair, I believe some level of ad blocking is a necessity with the internet that exists today. Before I became a writer I worked in desktop support and later as an infrastructure engineer and could have been described as an ad blocking zealot. The IT nerd in me wanted… This story continues at The Next Web Last week we learned that some European mobile networks plan to block advertising across their services beginning later in 2015. In response, Editor-in-Chief of The Next Web, Martin Bryant, wrote that ad blocking is “immoral” and that “ad-blocking folk out there are happily starving sites.” While I agree that blanket ad-blocking is perhaps unfair, I believe some level of ad blocking is a necessity with the internet that exists today. Before I became a writer I worked in desktop support and later as an infrastructure engineer and could have been described as an ad blocking zealot. The IT nerd in me wanted… This story continues at The Next Web
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