Insights

Communication and Technology news

These Arctic Pics Show How Extreme Weather Shifts Our Perspective

31/05/2013

Eirik Johnson’s photographs capture the architecture of these beautifully ramshackle cabins at different times of year. (...)
Eirik Johnson’s photographs capture the architecture of these beautifully ramshackle cabins at different times of year. Visit the Arctic in the winter, and you’d think you’ve stepped through a portal to Hoth. There’s little light, the landscape and anything on it is bleached white, and the temperature hovers around -25 degrees--cold enough to snuff out a tauntaun. The fictional planet was very much on photographer Eirik Johnson’s mind when he trekked through Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost city in the U.S., last December. He was there to document the area’s makeshift cabins, which he first encountered two years earlier. Johnson was in Barrow working on an environmental remediation project at a decommissioned navy base. He arrived in the summer of 2010, when the sun is permanently fixed above the horizon. Finding himself unable to adapt his circadian clock to the perpetual sunlight, Johnson spent his late “nights” exploring the region. At the edge of town near the Arctic waters, he came across hunting cabins built by the native Iñupiat tribe and began photographing them.Read Full Story     Eirik Johnson’s photographs capture the architecture of these beautifully ramshackle cabins at different times of year. Visit the Arctic in the winter, and you’d think you’ve stepped through a portal to Hoth. There’s little light, the landscape and anything on it is bleached white, and the temperature hovers around -25 degrees--cold enough to snuff out a tauntaun. The fictional planet was very much on photographer Eirik Johnson’s mind when he trekked through Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost city in the U.S., last December. He was there to document the area’s makeshift cabins, which he first encountered two years earlier. Johnson was in Barrow working on an environmental remediation project at a decommissioned navy base. He arrived in the summer of 2010, when the sun is permanently fixed above the horizon. Finding himself unable to adapt his circadian clock to the perpetual sunlight, Johnson spent his late “nights” exploring the region. At the edge of town near the Arctic waters, he came across hunting cabins built by the native Iñupiat tribe and began photographing them.Read Full Story    
thesecabinsarcticeirikjohnson’syeartimesdifferentramshacklebeautifully

Need a profissional and scalable solution for seriuos e-Commerce business?

Learn More about Shopify Plus

Cookies Usage

This website uses cookies to improve the user experience and feed the platform's statistical systems. By continuing, you will be accepting their use.